Leighann Chaffee, M.A.

Lecturer

Specialty: Psychology, Neuroscience, Ingestive Behavior, Stress Response

Chaffee, Leighann

Contact information

Dept: Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences
Room: GWP 229
Phone: 253-692-4775
Email: lchaffee@uw.edu
Schedule: Autumn 2013 office hours: Monday and Wednesdays, 12:00 - 1:00 p.m.

Degrees

  • M.A., Psychology (emphasis in Behavioral Neuroscience), Northern Arizona University, 2008.
  • B.A., Psychology; Mathematics Minor, Gonzaga University, 2006.

Biography

My focus in Psychology is the biological basis of behavior. As a student, my studies in psychology focused on neuroscience and behavior. As a professional, I challenge myself to continue my study of neuroscience and the biological basis of phenomena in psychology.

My current research focuses on the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning. Specifically, I examine self-regulated learning in college students, the pathways by which students acquire these skills, and the relationship between these skills and student performance. This focus influences my instructional strategies and I aim to provide students to develop self-regulated learning skills within my courses.

My previous research focused on the biological basis of the stress response and feeding behavior. I've conducted empirical studies utilizing electrophysiological and behavioral neuroscience methods, in both human and animal models. In the future, I aim to expand my interest in feeding and stress to examination of implicit attitudes and health in human participants.

Research

My current research focuses on inquiries in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning. Specifically, I am interested in self-regulated learning in college students, including avenues by which students acquire these skills, and the relationship between self-regulated learning and classroom performance.

Previously, I completed electrophysiological studies of the stress response in high and low anxiety college students. Additionally, I completed research in behavioral neuroscience, examining neural activation with potentiated feeding in a rodent model. In the future, I aim to expand my previous lines of research to a human model, examining implicit attitudes in feeding and health outcomes.

Teaching

  • TPSYCH 100: Introduction to Psychology
  • TPSYCH 209: Fundamentals of Psychological Research I
  • TPSYCH 210: Abnormal Psychology
  • TPSYCH 250: Human Cognition
  • TPSYCH 330: Inquiry and Research in the Social Sciences
  • TPSYCH 404: Psychology of Food and Culture

Affiliations

  • Member of the American Psychological Association
  • Member of the Society for Teaching of Psycholog